August 21st, 2017

Food Truck Series: Via 313

Posted in Consumer Trends, Food Trends, Food Trucks, Restaurants, Trailer/Street Foods, Trends

Via 313 Pizza

Pizza Trends

Pizza is a staple food of life, I think we can all agree on that. No matter your preference or dietary restrictions, someone out there has made a pretty darn good pizza just for you.

One of the true beauties of pizza is its different adaptations. Thin crust, thick crust, white pizza, flatbread, Mexican style, Korean BBQ, New York, Chicago, deconstructed; the list can go on and on.

After seeing a rise in the popularity of Detroit style pizza, we here at Culinary Culture decided to jump on the bandwagon and see what it’s all about. And what better place to find out then the rapidly expanding pizza truck turned brick and mortar restaurant here in Austin, Via 313.

Detroit Style Pizza

The first question to answer was, “what is Detroit style pizza?” Via 313 owner Brandon Hunt was kind enough to answer that question in an interview with Austin Eater. In his description, Detroit style pizza refers to a square pie, cooked in pans that are actually used in automotive plants for spare parts, caramelized cheese crusts, and a generous pour of sauce on top of the pizza when finished.

The second question is, “is it any good?” After tasting the Detroiter, a pie made with smoked pepperoni under the cheese and natural casing pepperoni atop, the Smokey, made with Black’s brisket and tangy BBQ sauce, and the Rocket (my favorite), stacked with hot Sopressatta, arugula, and shaved Parmesan, I can emphatically say yes. Very good.

The caramelized cheese around the crust stands out with both great texture and flavor. The crust is thick and crispy on the outside, but chewy in the middle. It’s very filling but a little oily for my preference. Via 313’s red sauce was a standout though. Vibrant red, fresh tasting, and filled with herbs. It complimented the pies well and something about having it on top cleans the palate between bites.

I’m officially on board with Detroit style pizza.

Detroit Pizza

If your splitting hairs, the location I visited technically isn’t a food truck. But since it began as a food truck, and this location is much closer to me then where the truck resides, I hope you’ll overlook this.

Thanks for reading along, now get out there and eat!

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
May 29th, 2017

NRA 2017 – Top Trends

Posted in Consumer Trends, Culinary Conferences, Food Shows, Food Trends, Packaging, Product Innovation

Top Trends in Food from the
2017 NRA Show

Wednesday wrapped up a great week of learning and exploration at the 2017 National Restaurant Association show in Chicago, Il.

There was so much to see, touch, taste, and learn, but I’ll try to pick a few really popular trends to highlight for those of you who couldn’t make it.

Let’s dive in…

#1 – Cold Brew Nitro Coffee

Well if there was one trend that popped up more than any other, it was cold brew nitro coffee. On tap, artisan, slushy, and soft serve varieties available for whatever application you could imagine.

#2 – Go Nuts for Donuts!

Honestly, donuts haven’t really gone anywhere. Everyone loves fried dough. But NRA would show us that donuts, especially exciting, decadent donuts, are thriving. People are loving the idea of customization and seeing donuts in unique places like sandwiches and sundaes.

#3 – Compostables

All image above courtesy of PacknWood. Available at https://www.packnwood.com/home.jhtm.

If you want to take a stake in this millennial market you better be using compostable products. From plates, cups, straws, wrapper, utensils, to-go boxes, and even chopsticks, compostable products have become a must for any operation that wants to be a serious competitor.

Others

Other noteworthy trends included sparkling beverages, including coffee and kombucha, guacamole variations, atomization in the food process, and a continuing array of vegetarian and vegan food products.

If you’ve noticed any cool trends or were at the NRA 2017 show and saw something I missed, let me know! We’d love to hear from you.

Cheers!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
March 27th, 2017

Food Trend Series: Free the Fire

Posted in Consumer Trends, Fire, Food Trends, Smoke

Research chefs

The Flavors of Fire Reign Supreme

It would seem that the love of smoke and fire have finally been accepted by the mainstream. Need proof? Check out Little Caesars latest release of the Smokehouse Pizza, topped with brisket, pulled pork, and smoked bacon along with a smokehouse seasoned crust.  Arby’s serves a similar Smokehouse sandwich made with brisket and smoked Gouda cheese. Even Applebee’s has jumped into the mix with the roll out of their wood fired grills in select locations.

Menu development

Image courtesy of Restaurant Facility Business

Tracking menu insights from 3rd quarter 2015 and 2016 the market research firm Mintel placed smoked flavors atop their list of rising flavor trends(1).

Empirical evidence backs up these statements as well. Think of how common smoked salts, fire roasted tomatoes or chilies, and charred citrus have become. Menus show items like smoked butterscotch coffee, fire roasted vegetables, and charred artichokes. Heck, one of the best cocktails I’ve ever drunk was served to me last weekend and included freshly burnt rosemary and mescal.

We can also see these fiery flavors showing up in condiments. Chipotle ketchup, pecan wood smoked maple syrup, smoked onion marmalade, and smoked black pepper pickles to name a few. I have no doubt a simple Google query would bring up a slew of other products I haven’t thought of. 

Fine dining restaurants nationwide have long been pushing the flaming trend forward with the use of wood burning stoves. Local to Austin you can enjoy foods slow roasted over wood fires at the likes of Odd Duck or Dai Due, the latter using beautiful customized elevator grills. Nationally, you can find wood fire kitchens from coast to coast, but for our New York friends a stand out would be Lilia in Brooklyn.

Lilia Hearth, courtesy of Tasting Table

Lilia Hearth, courtesy of Tasting Table

As chefs, we are stoked (get it?) by the fired and smoked food trend, as it hearkens back to the origins of cooking food with only wood and a spark. I feel a beard growing just thinking about it.

We would love to hear what you’re seeing out there in your culinary travels. Be sure to leave a comment and let us know.

 

Cheers!

-Chris

1. Weisberg, Karen. "Flavor Advances: Top Trends for 2017." Culinology. December 2016: 10-17. 6 Mar., 2017.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
February 13th, 2017

Good Eggs: More Than A Name

Posted in Consumer Trends, food tours, Food Trends, Grocery, Locally Grown, Organic, Recipes, Retail, Trends

Research Chefs

Good Eggs: More Than A Name

Founded in the summer of 2011, Good Eggs is an online market that delivers local, organic, sustainable foods and groceries to the San Francisco Bay area. With same day and next day delivery options, Good Eggs aims to connect people who love food directly with the people who make it.

One mission of Good Eggs, as my guide Angelica described during my site tour, is “to grow and sustain local food systems worldwide in order to change the supply chain from the ground up, making it better for everyone.” This noble and ambitious mission shines throughout the operation.

Chef Consultants

Unlike its online competitors (think Instacart, Amazon Fresh), Good Eggs receives their products straight from farmers and suppliers, rather than tapping into an existing market chain. They have established direct relationships with their producers and in turn have created a very efficient, mutually beneficial system of operation.

This direct relationship between producers and customers also puts Good Eggs in a unique position to see culinary trends develop in real-time. Angelica noted the popularity of local foods, especially produce, Korean ribs, ramen, the return of pasta, and bone broths in 2016 and sees no slowing down going into 2017.

Additionally, they’ve seen a push for easy weeknight meal solutions for busy families, especially those with young children. Dinners that can be prepared relatively quickly and without much fuss that still maintain healthful, natural, and craveable qualities are ideal. You can even get inspiration from unique, easy to follow chef developed recipes that are found on their website.

Restaurant Consultants

Good Eggs is working hard to drive away the misconception that natural markets are only within reach of those of a higher socioeconomic class by offering competitively priced groceries and a spectrum of comparable products. They’re also aiming to ensure that EBT and WIC benefits will eventually be allowed for use in their market.

In asking what one thing Angelica wished shoppers recognized about Good Eggs, she replied “We want customers to understand that Good Eggs is the simplest way to get groceries every week. That we’re priced the same as major markets, but we source directly so it’s as fresh as if you were getting them from a farmer’s market.”

Seem too good to be true? You be the judge.

Corporate chefs

If you’re in the San Francisco area give Good Eggs a try to see for yourself if they stack up. I can tell you first hand that after visiting their facility, I’m impressed not only with their food, but with their people. They truly believe in what they do and are determined to change the world.

Plus, where else are you going to find a whole pig’s head?

I can’t wait to see what they do next…

Culinary Consultants

 

Cheers!

Tags: , , , , , , ,
January 30th, 2017

Food Trends: Winter Fancy Food Show 2017

Posted in Consumer Trends, Food Shows, Food Trends, Healthy, Japanese, New Foods and Flavors

2017 Winter Fancy Food Show Trends

Well the 2017 Winter Fancy Food Show (FFS) in San Francisco is a wrap. With 3 showrooms full of great food, ingenious concepts, and wild fusions, picking just a few to highlight will be difficult, but I think I’m up to the challenge.

So let’s look at the 4 items that popped up the most and were used diversely at the FFS.

1. Harissa

img_6462

The heat is on, and you’d know this is true if you were anywhere near the FFS last week. Chile peppers, hot sauces, and spicy rubs were prevalent, but none shone quite as bright as the humble harissa. This complex North African chile paste made the rounds with applications in cheeses, simmer sauces, dry rubs, hummus, and even butter! So, it looks like harissa is here to stay and I say bring the heat!

2. Yuzu

Research Chefs

Photo Credit: thesweetartlab.com

A yuzu is a small, wrinkled citrus fruit that looks similar to a lemon used popularly in Japanese cuisine. The fruit itself hails from China originally and has become quite popular in Korean dishes as well. Yuzu creatively made its way into powdered seasonings, teas, infused shoyu sauces, and candies. With a complicated sweet, citrus, and sour flavor profile, and the proliferation of Eastern cuisine in the U.S., I imagine we’ll be seeing yuzu flavored items a lot more on menus and grocery shelves.

3. Umami Pastes

Culinary Consultant

This is a product that really excites me. Umami pastes activate our 5th taste by masterfully combining umami flavors like porcini mushroom, tomato, anchovy, and tomato and concentrating them into a rich paste that can be used in sauces, gravies, and pastas, or as rubs for meats. The pastes add a rich savory flavor that really takes you where you want to go. There are also miso based Asian versions with varieties such as ginger or togarashi pepper.

4. Hummus

Chef Consultants

The mighty chickpea continues to drive forward. There were more than a few new hummus flavors popping up at the Food Show, including some using the other trends we talked about above, but I was pleased to find black garlic among the troves. With its tangy richness and bold aroma, black garlic marries perfectly with a bright, smooth hummus. Another supremely unique product was the shelf-stable hummus developed by Hummustir. This clean label product comes with the ingredients in pre-portioned pouches that are shelf stable for up to 18 months. You simply stir the ingredients together and presto hummus. It’s darn good too!

For the sake of accuracy, coconut was also widely popular this year being found everywhere from water, paste, and ice cream to crisps, simmer and hot sauces. I only don’t mention it above because coconut has proved itself widely popular in the past. It’s a trend that’s not fading anytime soon.

That’s it for this week. I certainly hope you enjoyed reading about the FFS because I certainly enjoyed visiting it.

 

Cheers!

Tags: , , , , , , ,
November 28th, 2016

Eberly Restaurant Review

Posted in Consumer Trends, Food Trends, Gastro-Pub, Restaurants, Reviews

Eberly Restaurant Review

Dined 11/01/16

For months, I have been walking up and down South Lamar Blvd. wondering what was to become of the empty print shop holding prominent real estate between Paul Qui’s ever-bustling Uchi and the eventful Barton Springs cross street. With the Long Center and Zilker Park nearby whatever would come to the location was ripe with organic exposure.

You could imagine my excitement to find out a new restaurant helmed by John Scott and Eddy Patterson of Stubb’s Bar-B-Q fame would be filling the vacancy.

With a kitchen advertised as serving upscale American fare under the guidance of executive chef Jim Tripi (Spanish Oaks Golf Club) and executive pastry chef Natalie Gazaui (McGuire Moorman Hospitality), it seemed a new high-roller was looking to up the ante in South Austin.

Named after Austin’s famous heroine Angelina Eberly, the restaurant would also house the Cedar Tavern, a collection of drinking and contemplation spaces complete with a rooftop patio designed to mirror the famous New York tavern of the same name. In this space, Kelon Bryant, formerly of Justine’s Brasserie and the Continental Club, would be designing clever libations and pouring local drafts. The original Eberly served as the hub for many famous artists, including Bob Dylan and Jackson Pollock, and Austin’s Eberly hopes to serve as the hub for a new wave artists and free-thinkers.

The Interior

The interior proved elegant, spacious, and thoughtfully designed. A vast dining room with individual tables connected by large velvet lined bench seats fills the front dining area. The decor is a conscious juxtaposition of lavish furniture and ornamentation reminiscent of the Harlem Renaissance and the sharp edges and reflective surfaces equated with modern architecture.

A central atrium, lined with rows of high steam punk style support braces encased with clear glass walls transects the floor connecting the dining room to the Cedar Tavern. A rectangular glass ceiling holds the steel arms at bay while allowing a flood of natural light to fill the atrium, much to the pleasure of the many plants that adorn the walls and floors.

To the right of this room runs additional table seating and to the left a walkway parallel to the mouth of the open kitchen, allowing guests to see the action as they wander to and from the tavern or dining room. The additional traffic along this threshold provides an added obstacle for the front of house staff, but they seemed to navigate with ease.

Eberly Austin

Source: Icon Design+Build

The Cedar Tavern maintained a palpable energy with busy chatter, pulsing music, and the collision of ice, glass, and steel typical of a full-service bar. The centerpiece of the Cedar Tavern is the wooden bar itself. The fifty-foot-long mahogany marvel, complete with extensive hand-carved filigree, was purchased from the original Cedar Tavern when it closed in 2006. After being shipped to its new Austin location in pieces, it has been restored to its glory and remains a sight to be seen.

Dispersed throughout the mahogany scented tavern are plush couches, over-sized leather armchairs, and poufs inviting prolonged conversation and welcomed intermingling. This intellectual lounge atmosphere is a refreshing addition in South Austin.

The Drinks

The drink menu is a smart, concise collection of local beers and select wines. Draft beers include popular selections such as Live Oak Hefeweizen and Austin Eastciders Dry Cider, along with more adventurous selections such as the Founder’s Breakfast Stout and Deschutes’ Fresh Squeezed IPA out of Bend, OR. Bottled options offer a larger variety including Sours, Tripels, and Ales.

A selective wine list displays the right amount of options without creating the exhausting paradox of choice. The menu includes personal favorites such as the 2013 Newton Unfiltered Chardonnay out of Napa as well as the Italian 2012 Giodo Rosso, “IGT” Sangiovese. A selection of sparkling and fortified wines, scotches, and whiskeys are also available upon request.

The craft cocktails, however limited, are meticulously constructed. The list includes subtly playful gems such as the Lady Bond, which balances the floral notes of a sweet Lillet against a complex gin and the brightness Ketel One Citroen, along with bolder statement drinks like the Final Ward, a fascinating blend of Bulleit Rye and Green Chatreuse balanced with maraschino and lemon.

Ideally we will see this menu grow to ten or twelve options as the restaurant matures, but for now the choices are confident and invocative.

The Food

Now we discuss the most important part. No matter how radiant the interior nor mesmerizing the libations, if the food falls flat the restaurant will decay.

Starters

We began the meal with the house sourdough bread served with citrus fennel butter. The bread arrived warm with a distinctly sweet aroma finished with the tell-tale sourness of wild yeast. The interior showed a broad, albeit uneven, crumb with a chewy golden crust. The compound butter delivered its flavors accurately without proving overwhelming.

From there we were graced with a half-dozen expertly shucked New Brunswick oysters. The flavor was fresh and texture clean, without a hint of grittiness. The mignonette was well-balanced and nicely complemented the bivalve while the overall presentation was authentic.

I was surprised by the overall rustic nature of the cheese and crudité plate presentation. Not that it displeased me, more that I found it uncommon to the current norm of hyper-fashioned visages commonly seen in upscale eateries. Truthfully I found it refreshing. The choice of fennel and baby carrots acted as excellent palate cleansers after a generous bite of smoked jalapeno pimento cheese atop crispy flatbread. I especially enjoyed the latent note of coriander found in the pimento.

Entrees

As a lover of foods from the ocean I could not help but order the whole red snapper. There are few things that compare to the exquisite texture of a whole fish gently pan-fried to encrust the tender flesh in a crispy skin with a slight charring for added depth. Unfortunately, I was not presented with such a dish. Instead, I received a fish so exceedingly fried that the skin was more akin to a sarcophagus than a crust. The flesh was dry and had taken on a mealy, inconsistent flavor. I did, however, appreciate the balancing act between the smoked tomato and gremolata.

The short rib buoyed the experience with a delicate texture and bold flavor profile highlighted by a playful celeriac apple fondue. The presentation was classical and utilitarian.

The third and final selection was the venison and quail. While the flavors of this dish were, again, well thought out and pleasant, the execution disappointed. The venison was surprisingly tough and lacking in moisture, while the quail was arranged haphazardly on the plate.

Additionally, we shared orders of the asparagus and squash, Brussels and cauliflower, as well as shells and cheese which all proved to be well-prepared, nicely seasoned, and delicious.

Dessert

Eberly fancies itself a dining space serving contemporary American cuisine. Generally, the dinner menu reflects this with classic dishes prepared with flavor twists fashioned rustically without pretense.

I make that statement because the dessert menu stands in contrast of that. While providing takes on classics like PB&J and Donuts, they are more elitist than Americana.

While I hold no ill will towards the creativity that science has allowed us with cuisine, I fail to see how the dessert and dinner menus coexist. Perhaps it reflects Eberly’s romance with “risk takers, creative types, and liberated thinkers” as stated on the “About” page of their website, but as a diner it feels disjointed.

That being said, the Basque cake with poached pears was delightful. The honeycomb and Marcona almonds provided a wonderful flavor and texture contrast, however the Manchego cheese ice cream was too earthy and drew away from the balance.

The sweet potato cake donuts were another solid standout. With bourbon ganache, marshmallow, and pomegranate interplay, each bite was delightful. Top marks for creativity and textural variety.

Final Thoughts

They say the devil is in the details. Eberly proves this is true. The components are in place but the execution is hindering the potential excellence of the restaurant. The contrast between the upscale, yet rustic American dinner fare and the avant-garde nature of the dessert menu creates a discernible chasm in the cuisine. Conceptually I am excited by what Eberly is undertaking. The veneer is beautiful, the menu is thoughtful and thorough, but the performance is uneven. I can confidently say the missteps seen in this meal feel more of youthful exuberance than reckless ignorance. I hope with time and experience they will overcome these obstacles to live up to their potential, but until then, I remain skeptical.

Rating: 7/10

Location

Eberly & The Cedar Tavern
615 S Lamar Blvd.
Austin, TX 78704
Website

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
August 22nd, 2016

Austin Eats Series: Tacos

Posted in About Allison, About Christopher, Consumer Trends, New Foods and Flavors, Restaurants, Trends

1

Ok, let’s be honest, we’re not really treading any new ground here. Austin has some of the best tacos in the country. Everyone knows that. But it’s an ever-changing landscape with new ideas, ingredients, and innovations, so it’s always good to get a refresher. Plus, cards on the table, I’m new to Austin, I want to eat some tacos, and the boss gave me the thumbs up.

After talking with several locals, reading up on blogs, and scouring reviews, I wrangled my list of taco havens from 35 to 8. There are literally hundreds of taco trucks and restaurants in Austin so I’m going to the ones that constantly overlap as the best local representation of Austin’s taco heritage.

Remember, we’re measuring these on a scale of the best of the best, so I’m going to be fairly unforgiving with some ratings. All of these tacos are good, we’re looking for truly great!

Joe’s Bakery and Coffee Shop
2305 E 7th St. Austin, TX 78702                                                                                                      http://joesbakery.com

2

Joe’s did a great job of being straightforward. The tacos are executed well and exactly what they claim to be. No frills, no culinary liberties, just good ol’ fashioned tacos in a traditional sense. Seriously, they don’t bother wasting time with silliness like lettuce! It’s all about the meat at Joe’s. The carne guisada was a bit underwhelming but I have to say their chicharrone and picadillo tacos were excellent! Couldn’t help but love the fried pork chop taco, because, well, it’s fried pork! Their homemade tortillas are just awesome; chewy and perfectly charred. Plus, for the average price of $2 a taco you can get full quick without breaking the bank.

Rating out of 10: 8

Tamale House East
1707 E 6th St. Austin, TX 78702
http://www.yelp.com/biz/tamale-house-east-austin

3

Tamale House East came with high expectations but unfortunately didn’t deliver on the goods. Of the six tacos I had two were too sweet to enjoy (grilled fish and cochinita pibil), lacking overall balance, and the tortilla on the al pastor was so chewy I just gutted the taco and ate the fillings with a fork. Overall the flavors were average at best and the execution was sub-par. The savior of this service was the delicious, smoky, melty, spicy chicken mole. The tortilla was grilled perfectly and it truly stole the show.

Rating out of 10: 6

Taco More
9414 Parkfield Dr. Austin TX 78758
http://www.tacomore.biz/TacoMore/Texas/Austin.aspx

4

Ummm, Taco More? Yes, please! More is the definitive word here. Combine their succulent, traditional style tacos with the crazy spread of goodies on the salsa bar (ranging from colorful salsas to grilled jalapeños) and you can’t be disappointed. The pastor, carnitas, and pollo tacos all get top marks for flavor and execution. Their just plain delicious. The true stand out was the cabrito (goat) taco. Gorgeous red color and a smoky citrus flavor profile blended with the gamey richness of the goat made it an instant favorite. The only letdown on this menu was the under seasoned and sadly dull lengua. I’d recommend skipping that for the melt in your mouth chorizo taco.

Rating out of 10: 9

Veracruz All Natural
1704 E Cesar Chavez St. Austin, TX 78702
http://veracruztacos.com

5

The “All-Natural” portion of Veracruz leads to a higher price point per taco, but overall decent eats. The characteristic that ran through my tasting here was really light flavors. There are no truly exciting seasonings or flavor bursts on this menu. Every taco benefitted from either a hearty burst of lime (which were not provided with the tacos) or a slathering of salsa. Execution was on point though. All items, including the fish taco, were tender, moist, and overall cooked excellently. The standout for Veracruz was definitely the steak taco, which, unlike the others, was seasoned perfectly.

Rating out of 10: 7.5

Rosita’s Al Pastor
1911 E Riverside Dr. Austin, TX 78798
http://www.yelp.com/biz/rositas-al-pastor-austin

6

Compliment sandwich time. Rosita’s al pastor is AWESOME! Not the whole menu, just to be clear, the actual al pastor. There’s definitely a reason that’s in the restaurant’s name. Great flavor, color, execution, and balance of citrus and spice. The gringa taco, which is al pastor grilled with cheese, is melty fabulousness. Give me 5 of those any day. I’ll skip the rest of the tacos though. Mostly bland, oily, and generally unimpressive. Really disappointed with the mushy, flavorless chicharron that was practically inedible on texture alone. On that note, their salsas are terrific! To summarize: al pastor = YES, all others = NO.

Rating out of 10: 5

Papalote
2803 S Lamar Blvd. Austin, TX 78704
http://yumpapalote.com

7

Papalote gets a standing ovation from this eater. What an awesome spread of delicious tacos. They land on more of the culinary side of things with additions like plantain and cactus, but boy do they bring the flavor! Go straight for the alambres taco, a cheesy mix of steak and bacon that just thinking about makes my mouth water. The smoky pork adobada taco made with fresh cactus and queso fresco is another can’t miss. It’s peppery, fatty, and earthy in all the best possible ways. This really was a near perfect spread with clear understanding of flavor and care taken in the cooking process. No doubt that Papalote will become a regular stop for me.

Rating out of 10: 9.5

Torchy’s Tacos: Trailer Park
1311 South 1st St. Austin, TX 78704
http://torchystacos.com

8

Torchy’s is an Austin staple and therefore an obligatory stop for any taco investigator. But, to truly see what they’re all about, skip the restaurants staffed by college students and go back to the trailer park, where it’s a true labor of love. One thing I loved about Torchy’s was their creativity and boldness. Tacos sporting jalapeño sausages, seared tuna, and fried chicken represent their adventurous spirit. Unfortunately, not all of the swings were a hit. The pork on the green chile taco and barbacoa on the democrat were dry and oily, as if they’d been stewing in fat over too high heat for a long time. The fried avocado was very bland and the creamy sauce just added sweetness rather than flavor. Conversely, the tuna was seared masterfully with a solid strip of pink in the center and The Independent was absolute gold! Well-seasoned, flavorful, touting a solid complimentary sauce, this unaffiliated bad boy stood alone amongst the rest. Also, don’t sleep on the Trailer Park; fried chicken + poblano = GOOD!

Rating out of 10: 7.5

Valentina’s Tex Mex
7612 Brodie Ln. Austin, TX 78745
http://www.valentinastexmexbbq.com

Picture2

I’ll be honest, I really didn’t know what to expect when it came to Tex-Mex BBQ tacos. I mean, I’m a culinarian, I love food, and I love fusion, but I had my hesitations. Well, did Valentina’s ever make me eat my words (along with all of their tacos). Seriously, phrases like melt in your mouth, masterful execution, and mind-blowing flavor profiles just scratch the surface. The brisket with tomato serrano salsa is rich but not fatty, seasoned well, spicy but not palate busting, and cut perfectly with fresh citrus. Smoked carnitas with tomatillo habanero, are you kidding? Oh, and how ‘bout the beer marinated beef fajita that tastes like something the beer and BBQ gods gave birth to after a night of margaritas and salsa dancing. Oh, and whatever you do get something topped with that sinfully spicy/sour Cole slaw, you won’t regret it. Yea, I’m gushing about this one and I’m not even a little sorry. It’s food crack and I’m hooked.

Rating out of 10: 10

That’s it for this week. I hope you enjoyed the taco round of Austin Eats. Next round we’re going to be looking at all the great vegetarian eateries for my greenies out there (bet you thought I forgot about you), so stay tuned.

Cheers!

March 8th, 2016

How High Speed Home Delivery Will Change How We Eat in 2016

Posted in Consumer Trends, Food Trends, Marketing, Product Innovation, Promotions, Restaurants, Retail, Trends

If you are craving a burger, but don’t feel like leaving the house, you’re not alone. According to Technomic’s 2016 food trends, the shift to eating in is driving significant growth in the easy order app sector, allowing consumers to order from the comfort of their couch. This trend toward cozy dinners in front of the TV, while watching Netflix in your pajamas, is just beginning to pick up traction. And it’s not limited to fast food either: Safeway and Meijer will deliver your groceries. It’s estimated up to 17 percent of grocery shopping to be done online by the year 2023.

Let’s look at some of the major players in the food delivery sector:

Uber: this rideshare giant has cornered the market in transporting people. They even have some novel offerings, such their ‘puppy delivery service’. Essentially bringing adoptable puppies to you for a play date. This summer they delivered free ice cream if you ordered through the app. A partnership with InterContinental Hotels Group allows riders to earn points towards their stay at participating hotels. And yes, Uber is getting into the food delivery business with Uber Eats, their food delivery platform. Serving 12 cities, including Paris and Toronto, they guarantee a 10 minute delivery within a very limited delivery range. Once you order the food, you just pick it up curbside. How simple is that?

Amazon: they have the drones, they have Amazon Prime, and now they have Amazon Prime Now, which can deliver anything from groceries to cleaning supplies in under 2 hours. That time is cut in half with an order of food arriving within 1 hour. The current delivery area is limited, serving only seven cities as of March 2016. They do have an advantage over the Uber model in that they seem to cover a larger area, you just have to wait a little longer. They even offered free cookies during the holiday season as a promotion.

Postmates: also an up and coming delivery service that features a plethora of items for delivery. Get your groceries and lunch with a delivery fee starting at an affordable $4.99. They also offered for the holidays a “12 days of Christmas” promotion where you could choose from an array of gifts to be delivered each day of the promotion. They have signed agreements with Chipotle, McDonald’s and Starbucks.

Doordash: established in 2013, they are a relative fledgling in the delivery service industry. Regardless, DoorDash has already managed to secure contracts with Taco Bell, KFC and Dunkin’ Donuts. They are also in a pending litigation with In-N-Out regarding delivery of their food without permission. The lawsuit calls into question the issues of food safety and trademark infringement. Brand identity and food safety are pretty critical to any chain establishment, so the outcome of this lawsuit could set the tone for the future of delivery service companies.

EatOutIn: This model employs an interface where the order is sent to the restaurant and an independent driver in the local area are notified when a delivery is ready. One of the first entrants into this market, the company has been serving the Austin, TX area since 1986 with recent expansions to San Antonio and Houston.

Grubhub: one of the pioneers of the food delivery industry and the one you are probably most familiar with, Grubhub has the largest delivery base, including over 1000 cities and more than 40,000 restaurants. Their “Track Your Grub” feature gives real time updates on the status of your order. The recently merged with Seamless and formed GrubHub, Inc. in August 2013. Dedicated to bringing the best delivery dining experience, the company offers 24/7 order support to its customers.

 

February 22nd, 2016

Marketing Your Food Brand to the Customers You Love

Posted in About Allison, Consumer Trends, Food Trends, Marketing, Promotions, Restaurants, Trends

We all know that proper marketing of your food brand is just as critical as the food you serve your customers. Effective marketing differentiates your concept from the next, defines your audience, and connects you to them in a positive way.

One of the most powerful ways to bond with your customers is through emotion. Your beliefs and values are what attract customers to your company, so your brand and marketing are critical to maintaining loyalty. How you convey your mission to your customer sets the tone for any future interactions.

Here are some ways that well-known brands are building successful consumer relationships:

ZPizza: their Nice zSLice program is a partnership with 200 nationwide schools to reward kindness. Each October during National Bullying Prevention month, teachers can offer complimentary coupons for slices of pizza to students as a way to reward kind behavior towards others. The initiative also includes pizza parties and materials that educators can use in the classroom.

Chick-Fil-A: just announced in early January, the “Moms” valet service is a new program to help hectic families make the ordering process easier. Parents with little kids can first order through the drive-through, requesting a valet. Once they receive their order in the car, they dine in the restaurant, at an assigned table including the exact number of high chairs that the family needs. The idea came from seeing young families struggle with the ordering process all while trying to wrangle the little ones. Once again, Chick-Fil-A honors its commitment to its family values.

Red Mango: the company created its Raw6 one-day juice cleanse with the help of Erika Bernhard, a registered dietician with Crave Nutrition Solutions LLC. The Raw6 retails for $42.00 and includes 6 specially crafted fruit and vegetable juice combinations. The program, developed with the healthy consumer in mind, provides a juice cleanse that is easy and approachable for the consumer. The products provide a healthy cleanse option without having to compromise on nutrition.

&Pizza: the brand has been offering free “&” tattoos to its employees, more commonly known as the “tribe”, for the past year. It also offers the free tattoo to its loyal customers once they spend $1500.00. They consider their brand, a “human” brand, and the “&” tattoo is clearly aligned with their core value set and celebration of “oneness”.

Pizza Patron: in an effort to their appreciation to veterans, Pizza Patron just launched its “Veterans Por Favor” program. Fully qualified and honorably discharged veterans will get the $20,000 fee on their first restaurant waived by the company. The program, set to run through the end of 2016 and available in Texas, makes a franchise offering a reality for candidates with the qualifications but not the bankroll.

Nekter Juice Bar: in a program clearly targeted to consumers trying to eat healthier, Nekter has designed a program to instill healthy habits in its consumers. Titled “21 Days of Nekter”, it represents the minimum number of days it takes to instill a new habit. As part of the program, they also offer a 6 bottle cleanse, including Activated Charcoal Lemonade and Green Nut Milk, as well as two seasonal soups (“Creamy” Tomato and Butternut Squash).

DQ: in a new twist, DQ is offering their blizzards served to the customer upside down. This is a call out to their values of quality and started January 1st. If your blizzard is not served to you upside down, your next one is free. The new program highlights the company’s philosophy of offering innovative and unexpected flavors and trends.

How do you connect with your consumers? In the end, your ability to interface effectively with your audience is critical to your brand success.