January 15th, 2018

Clean Label Movement

Posted in Consumer Trends, Educational, Retail

More Companies Moving Towards Clean Label in 2018

Clean Label

Consumers are continuing the march for clean label products moving into 2018. According to PMMI’s 2017 Trends in Food Processing Operations Market Research Report, 37% of consumers find it important to understand the nutrition facts label, while 91% of consumers believe that foods with recognizable ingredients are healthier.

Clean and transparent practices in food production include easy to understand food labels, responsible agricultural practices, and the use of natural ingredients. Clean labels have become so important to customers, we’ve seen the call make it all the way to the steps of the White House. With the upcoming implementation of a new nutrition facts label, the nutrients of food  products will be displayed in a manner that makes cleaner options much more visually attractive to a consumer.

Clean Label Opportunities

Clean Label Restaurants

This generates a huge opportunity for food producers to get ahead of the legislation and move toward clean labels voluntarily. QSR and fast food restaurants, such as Panera Bread, Pizza Hut, Subway, and Taco Bell, have been early adopters of such practices. Just this week Dunkin’ Brands and Baskin-Robbins announced they will be removing all artificial colors from their products.

Campbell’s is making a big push with their new line of Well Yes! soups featuring wholesome grains and vegetables. Additionally, Rich Products Corp., Pamela’s Products, and General Mills have begun distribution of more decadent clean label products like cheesecakes, cookies, and layered nut bars.

What’s Next?

Clean Label Food

This is only a snapshot of the current clean label movement. It will be interesting to watch the trend spread into other, less glamorous markets such as full service gas stations and entertainment vendors (like BaseBowls’ Poke Bowl in Dodgers Stadium).

Jump in the conversation and let us know what you see coming in the clean label movement and we push ahead into 2018.

Happy New Year!

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December 4th, 2017

Green Tomato Dashi Recipe

Posted in Educational, Food Trends, Japanese

Green Tomato Dashi Recipe

Dashi Recipe

One thing we love to do here at Paradise is eat, and eat well. Therefore, we want you to eat well too! And to help you along, when we find a great recipe we just can’t help but share.

Today’s recipe is for green tomato dashi, and oh is it a winner!

Dashi is a traditional Japanese cooking stock or soup made most commonly with kombu (edible kelp) and dried fish (i.e. bonito flakes or katsuobushi). It makes for a very flavorful, exotic broth great for soups, poaching seafood, or steaming clams. See what other great uses you can come up with for this savory, umami packed broth.

Green Tomato Dashi: 32oz

  • Water – 18qt
  • Kombu Sheets – 8ea
  • White Soy Sauce – 1/2 C
  • Salt – As Needed
  • Bonito Flakes – 4 C
  • Green Tomato – 1 ea
  • Vegetable Oil – As Needed
  • Black Pepper, ground – As Needed


  1. Combine water, kombu, white soy sauce, and salt in a large stock pot and bring to a simmer. Cook for 45 minutes.
  2. Remove stock from heat and add bonito flakes, rest for 15 minutes.
  3. Strain stock through a fine mesh sieve and set aside.
  4. Toss tomato in oil, salt, and pepper and smoke for 2hrs at 225*F. It should be very soft and wilted.
  5. While still hot, blend 3 parts dashi to one part tomato until smooth. Thin out with more dashi if necessary.
  6. Strain once more through fine mesh if desired.
  7. Enjoy!

Soup Recipes

A special thanks to Plate Magazine for the awesome recipe.

Thanks for reading along and let us know what awesome uses for the green tomato dashi you found.



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November 13th, 2017

Thanksgiving Recipes

Posted in Educational, Food Trends, Recipes

Festive Thanksgiving Recipes

Nothing beats the holiday season, and what better way to celebrate turkey day then with some fun, delicious new Thanksgiving recipes!

Thanksgiving is a favorite for most chefs and foodies. It’s a whole day dedicated to feasts and gratitude. How can you beat that? So whether you’re cooking for the entire extended family, or just a small group of friends, check out these ideas to update your traditional menu.

Thanksgiving Food

Photo courtesy of platingsandpairings.com

Balsamic Cranberry Brussels Sprouts

Check out this awesome twist on a classic Thanksgiving vegetable side. The cranberries and balsamic offer and perfect sweet and sour flavor to balance out the roasted bitter notes of the sprouts. See the recipe here.






Thanksgiving Recipes

Photo courtesy of myrecipes.com

Squash Soup with Chile Puree

Here’s an exciting Southwestern flip on a classic fall soup. The chile puree offers an inner warmth to the squash soup that can’t be beat. Even the skeptics will find themselves surprised by this new flavor. See the recipe here.






Thanksgiving food

Photo courtesy of epicurious.com

Peking Style Roasted Turkey

Looking for an Asian flare on your traditional roasted turkey? Look no further.  Roasted in the Peking style, this turkey combines that flavors of soy, molasses, orange, and ginger to make an enticingly unique bird. See the recipe here.






Thanksgiving desserts

Photo courtesy of myrecipes.com

Ancho Chile Pumpkin Pie

Thanksgiving isn’t complete without at least 1 pumpkin pie. And this one’s a zinger! Ancho-chiles (I’d recommend a puree over dried powder for more flavor) are added to the mix for a smoky, somewhat fruity pepper taste. See the recipe here.






I hope these recipes help inspire you to twist up your Thanksgiving menu this year. From all of us at Dish-Bliss and Paradise Tomato Kitchens, happy Thanksgiving!

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October 31st, 2017

Spooky Halloween Recipes

Posted in Educational, Recipes

I Scream, You Scream, for Halloween!

Happy Halloween Dish-Bliss readers! It’s that time of year for witches and goblins and vampires (oh my!). Here at DB and PTK we’re ready to dance the night away with Winifred Sanderson and The Pumpkin King.

But all that excitement is bound to stir up your appetite for more than just brains. We’re here to help you avoid the sugar coma induced by gorging on candy with three fun Halloween recipes. These are bound to please a whole murder of crows, or just a couple spooks resting their bones at home for the night.

Halloween Food

Photo Courtesy of plainchicken.com

Pizza Skulls

Check out these easy to make stuffed pizza skulls for a delicious handheld meal fit to quench that cannibal craving for meat! See the recipe here.






Halloween Treats

Photo courtesy of womansday.com

Spider Dipper

Look out for fangs on this eight-legged freak. Instead, tear off a leg for a savory snack that’ll satisfy your lust for carnage, and bread sticks! See the recipe here.






Halloween Recipes

Photo courtesy of thegunnysack.com.

Meatball Pumpkins

All the festivities without the fright. These meatball pumpkins are the perfect Halloween food for all the monsters in your life. See the recipe here.






From all of us here at Dish-Bliss and Paradise Tomato Kitchens, Happy Halloween everyone!!!

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September 18th, 2017

Chile Pepper 101

Posted in Educational

An Introduction to Chile Peppers

Chile Peppers

Let’s kick this right off by covering a little spelling and grammar. Chile, the proper noun, is a South American country that lies between the Andes mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Chili (notice the “i” on the end), is a stew made of peppers, meat, sometimes tomatoes, and depending on the side of the argument you’re on, beans. Finally, a chile, is a fruit of the plant from the Genus capsicum. There, I’m glad we cleared that up.

Now we can talk about chile peppers and all their glory. Recently, we posted a blog titled “Hot Sauce 101”, which was, as the title suggested, an intro to how hot sauce is made. So, we thought it would be appropriate to post a “Chile Pepper 101,” discussing the finer points of this wonderful fruit.


Chiles are native to the New World and were originally dubbed “peppers” by Christopher Columbus, however they are unrelated to peppercorns. Chile peppers come in a variety of shapes, sizes, and colors, and they get their heat from capsaicin, a chemical stored in the plant’s placental ribs. Hot, dry conditions yield peppers higher in capsaicin, and as a rule of thumb the smaller the pepper the hotter it is.

Chile pepper scoville

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/scoville-scale-for-spicy-food-2013-11

The heat of capsaicin is commonly measured on the Scoville Scale (developed by Wilbur Scoville in 1912), a subjective rating designed to measure the perception of capsaicin in chiles. The scale ranges from 0 (bell pepper) to 16,000,000 (pure capsaicin). The higher the number, the hotter the pepper.

Asian, Indian, Latin American, and Mexican cuisines rely heavily on chileschili peppers, which makes sense considering the climates of these countries. They can be used fresh, whole, chopped, stuffed, roasted, dried, ground, re-hydrated, pickled, or pureed. They are versatile in heat, flavor, and application.

A word of caution. When working with chiles, especially the hotter ones, be sure to wear gloves. The last thing you want to do is rub your eyes (or a more sensitive area…) after dicing up a fresh habanero. I can promise you, that does not end well.

Thanks for reading along, now go forth and eat!

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