April 10th, 2017

Chef Tip: Saving Wilted Vegetables

Posted in Grocery, Healthy, Tips

How To Save Wilted Vegetables

It’s happened to all of us. As we rummage through the crisper we find that bunch of wilted vegetables or herbs we forgot all about.

As enlightened culinarians, we are swept by an initial feeling of regret over the neglect of these cruciferous crusaders and the resentment of having to put them in the compost. But fear not friends, there a chance we can revive that poor produce with a simple soaking method.

Cold Soak

Vegetables lose their perkiness first and foremost due to evaporation. Water is stored in the cellulose structure of the plant’s cell wall. As the plant ages and/or is exposed to heat the wall begins to weaken due to enzymatic activity and water is released to the atmosphere.

Therefore, it makes perfect sense that the best way to perk up sad vegetables is to soak them in an ice water bath. This slows enzymatic reactions and replaces lost water in the cell walls, leading to happy, revitalized produce. For most vegetables and herbs a soaking period of 15 – 60 minutes is adequate.

Wilted Vegetables

Image courtesy of Whole Foods Market

Now, it’s safe to say this won’t work with every bit of produce that has lost it’s way. Some will be too far gone, especially those that have succumbed to rot and decay. Cold water can’t heal them.

This trick also works great for simply maximizing the appeal of fresh produce. Soaking greens and herbs before serving in a salad or as garnish will give them extra vibrancy and crispiness. Fennel and carrots take to this method very well.

So experiment away and let us know what works and what doesn’t. Until next time…

 

Cheers!

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January 30th, 2017

Food Trends: Winter Fancy Food Show 2017

Posted in Consumer Trends, Food Shows, Food Trends, Healthy, Japanese, New Foods and Flavors

2017 Winter Fancy Food Show Trends

Well the 2017 Winter Fancy Food Show (FFS) in San Francisco is a wrap. With 3 showrooms full of great food, ingenious concepts, and wild fusions, picking just a few to highlight will be difficult, but I think I’m up to the challenge.

So let’s look at the 4 items that popped up the most and were used diversely at the FFS.

1. Harissa

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The heat is on, and you’d know this is true if you were anywhere near the FFS last week. Chile peppers, hot sauces, and spicy rubs were prevalent, but none shone quite as bright as the humble harissa. This complex North African chile paste made the rounds with applications in cheeses, simmer sauces, dry rubs, hummus, and even butter! So, it looks like harissa is here to stay and I say bring the heat!

2. Yuzu

Research Chefs

Photo Credit: thesweetartlab.com

A yuzu is a small, wrinkled citrus fruit that looks similar to a lemon used popularly in Japanese cuisine. The fruit itself hails from China originally and has become quite popular in Korean dishes as well. Yuzu creatively made its way into powdered seasonings, teas, infused shoyu sauces, and candies. With a complicated sweet, citrus, and sour flavor profile, and the proliferation of Eastern cuisine in the U.S., I imagine we’ll be seeing yuzu flavored items a lot more on menus and grocery shelves.

3. Umami Pastes

Culinary Consultant

This is a product that really excites me. Umami pastes activate our 5th taste by masterfully combining umami flavors like porcini mushroom, tomato, anchovy, and tomato and concentrating them into a rich paste that can be used in sauces, gravies, and pastas, or as rubs for meats. The pastes add a rich savory flavor that really takes you where you want to go. There are also miso based Asian versions with varieties such as ginger or togarashi pepper.

4. Hummus

Chef Consultants

The mighty chickpea continues to drive forward. There were more than a few new hummus flavors popping up at the Food Show, including some using the other trends we talked about above, but I was pleased to find black garlic among the troves. With its tangy richness and bold aroma, black garlic marries perfectly with a bright, smooth hummus. Another supremely unique product was the shelf-stable hummus developed by Hummustir. This clean label product comes with the ingredients in pre-portioned pouches that are shelf stable for up to 18 months. You simply stir the ingredients together and presto hummus. It’s darn good too!

For the sake of accuracy, coconut was also widely popular this year being found everywhere from water, paste, and ice cream to crisps, simmer and hot sauces. I only don’t mention it above because coconut has proved itself widely popular in the past. It’s a trend that’s not fading anytime soon.

That’s it for this week. I certainly hope you enjoyed reading about the FFS because I certainly enjoyed visiting it.

 

Cheers!

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January 9th, 2017

Chef Tips: Garlic

Posted in Healthy, Locally Grown, Tips

Garlic

Let’s Talk Garlic

Garlic is a cook’s close friend and longtime companion. It can be chopped, minced, sliced, pasted, fermented, blackened, pickled, roasted, etc.

Not only does garlic provide flavor and aroma to food, it is also thought to provide a myriad of health benefits including the ability to “reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases, have anti-tumor and antimicrobial effects, and show benefit on high blood glucose concentration.”(source).

Picking Garlic

In U.S. markets, there are 2 major sources of garlic, California and China. Chinese garlic tends to be much less flavorful with a lower brix level and can have a metallic taste. California grown garlic is sweet, plump, and aromatic. The easiest way to spot California grown garlic is by flipping it over. If the root is still present, it’s more than likely CA grown. If the root has been removed, leaving a concave smooth spot, it’s likely Chinese. This method is not 100% accurate mind you. Some U.S. growers do remove the root for aesthetic purposes, but it’s less common.

Peeling Garlic

There’s certainly more than one way to peel garlic, and each cook has their own favorite method. I’ll share with you the basics.

To peel a single clove of garlic, remove the clove and place it flatly on a cutting board. With a chef’s knife, slice off the blunt (root) end (1). Now lay your blade flat on the clove and press down with your palm to break (2). You should now be able to pull the garlic clove away from the husk (3).

To peel a whole garlic bulb, start by setting the bulb top side down (root facing up) on a cutting board. Using your palm press straight down into the root, breaking the cloves away from each other (1). Discard the root stem and separate any remaining joined cloves (2). Place the garlic cloves in a steel bowl, cover with a second steel bowl rim to rim, and shake vigorously for 10-20 seconds. The cloves should now be separated from their husks (3).

Cutting Garlic

For beautiful thinly sliced garlic, ensure you either use the second peeling method listed above, or go the more laborious route by cutting the end of the garlic clove and manually removing the husk with your fingers (1). Smashing the clove will result in a broken clove that does not slice nicely. Once peeled, use a chef’s or paring knife to thinly slice (almost translucent) the garlic from the root to the tip (2), leaving delicate wheels of garlic (3). This type of garlic is best used for dishes like oil based pastas or stir-fry where the garlic will be highlighted, or toasted for garnish.

For chopped garlic break the clove with the flat end of a chef’s knife (1) then chop roughly to the desired size (2). This type of non-uniform product is best for use in slow, wet cooking, and when further processing will be involved, as in a tomato sauce that will be made uniform with an immersion or table top blender.

Minced Garlic

The process for minced garlic is similar like of chopped garlic, however, the goal is to create small, uniform pieces by chopping thoroughly with your knife. This allows the garlic to be cooked at precisely the same rate and is best for when the garlic must be sautéed at high heat momentarily, as in a braised meat dish or Indian curry.

Finally, pasted garlic begins with minced garlic. Sprinkle a pinch of course Kosher salt over the garlic for added grit (1) and using the flat side of your knife, scrape the garlic back and forth on the cutting board (2). With one hand, hold the handle to the knife, and with the other hand, apply pressure with your fingertips to the top of the blade. Use controlled motions and be methodical to prevent slippage. Pasted garlic (3) can be used unilaterally, but is best suited for finished dressings or for uses that don’t require cooking.

Cooking with Garlic

Cooks commonly believe that garlic must be heavily cooked or browned for dishes, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Except for certain dishes like Indian bhindi, garlic is cooked and ready the moment it becomes fragrant. This normally happens around 30 seconds, depending on the temperature of the pot or pan.

Garlic can safely be cooked much longer in foods that contain high levels of moisture, as in tomato sauces or soups, because the liquid can only reach a maximum temperature 212 degrees Fahrenheit, protecting the garlic from burning. This protection does not exist in a dry cooking where the temperature can easily exceed over 500 degrees Fahrenheit.

That’s it for this week. We hope you learned something useful and until next time, keep cooking!

Cheers!

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November 14th, 2016

Food Trends Series: Ancient Grains

Posted in Food Trends, Gluten Free, Grains, Healthy, Trends
Food Trends Research Chef
Picture courtesy of Restaurant Girl

Food Trends – Ancient Grains

With the increased public interest in food trends such as farm to table and eco-friendly food service, it should come as no surprise that ancient grains are breaking into the spotlight.

While all grains are, technically, ancient, this term refers to those oldest varieties that haven’t been transformed by humans over the thousands of years we’ve been growing them. Examples include:

While not an exhaustive list, this does illustrate the diversity of ancient grains. Each of these provides different flavors, textures, and dense nutritional profiles to assist in the maintenance of a healthful diet.

Food Trends Recipe development
Picture courtesy of NY Times Cooking

Ancient grains also gain attention for their hypoallergenic nature. Most are inherently gluten-free and when used in place of standard wheat flours, remove one of the top allergens from a recipe.

Diners love the authenticity and excitement that the use of ancient grains provides and chefs love the versatility of using them. From components in simple sides or salads, coatings for other foods either whole or in the form of flours, or as a reliable main dish, ancient grains are becoming staples of the professional chef and home cook’s kitchen.

Research on Food Trends
Savory Oatmeal Picture courtesy of Daily Burn

For more great information about ancient grains read the June edition of the Culinology Magazine provided by our friends at the Research Chefs Association.

Also, check out these unique recipes using ancient grains:

Thanks for reading along! If you’ve seen any awesome or unique uses of ancient grains, or want to talk food trends, leave a comment below. We’d love to hear from you.

 

Cheers!

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November 1st, 2016

Food Truck Series: Cazamance

Posted in About Allison, About Christopher, Food Trends, Food Trucks, Healthy, New Foods and Flavors, Restaurants, Trailer/Street Foods, Trends

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Ubuntu: I am because we are. This is the sign that welcomes you to Cazamance, a West African inspired food truck in South Austin. The word “Ubuntu” literally translates into “human-ness,” which is the African philosophy of universal human connection. It’s this philosophy that inspires the unique and approachable food produced here.

Owned and operated by Chef Iba Thiam, who brings culinary experience from West Africa, France, New York, and, of Course, Austin, Cazamance operates by the ethos that delicious beverages and great-tasting food are the secret to making life better. I certainly can’t argue with that!

So let’s dive in to the 2nd installment of the Dish Bliss Austin food truck series and talk food…

Dakar Lamb Wrap

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The fatty earthiness of the lamb is balanced well with a sweet acidic tomato relish to give the wrap a surprisingly light flavor. The melted brie adds a pungent, creaminess that, while unexpected, works well within this scheme. The creamy Sriracha sauce served on the side really took this dish to the next level. The lamb itself could, however, have benefited from additional seasoning and a pinch of salt. Overall quite nice.

Vegan Curry

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I truly appreciate when a vegan dish offers bold flavors and heartiness, which are characteristically lacking in this category. That’s exactly what the vegan curry brought. Offered in either a wrap or on a bed of fresh spinach, as many of Chef Iba’s dishes are, the curry was well-rounded with good spiciness. It, like the lamb though, simply lacked that dash of salt to fully bring out all of those complex flavors.

Mafe Vegetables

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I went off menu to get this dish, and luckily for me, the Chef had some leftover from a catering event from the night before. A nice medley of vegetables and white beans stewed in a peanut butter sauce made the mafe hearty and satisfying. I would have preferred a little more heat along with, yet again, a pinch of salt, but overall flavorful and filling.

Yassa Chicken

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This was by far my favorite item. Tangy and tender pulled chicken with smoky poblano peppers came together ceremoniously under a generous sprinkling of salty feta cheese. I could’ve easily eaten three helpings of this gem. I chose to have this served on a bed of spinach, which was crisp and wonderfully fresh.

Piri Piri

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What a treat the Piri Piri was. Aromas of cinnamon and clove emit from the juicy smoked pulled pork. Flavorful and well-seasoned with a slight heat from the serrano sauce and a great textural contrast between the crispy pieces of pork and the soft starchiness of the plantain. This is the type of dish that keeps you coming back for more.

Fresh Young coconut

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Just consider this the cherry on top. A fresh, butcher cut coconut served with a straw. The fresh, sweet milk was the perfect palate cleanser for the complex seasonings. And, as an added touch of hospitality, April and Iba will happily split the coconut open for you after you finish the milk so you can eat the meat for dessert. Delightful!

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Thoughts

Aside from the under-seasoning of a few of the dishes I found Cazamance innovative, well executed, and crave-worthy. I appreciate the essence of their food and love its healthful qualities. In a landscape of tacos and chicken wings, Cazamance offers a deliciously unique alternative.

Location

4204 Manchaca Rd.
Austin, TX 78704

Located behind Radio Coffee and Beer.

512-769-9560

www.cazamance.com

September 26th, 2016

Food Trucks Series: Picnik

Posted in Food Trends, Food Trucks, Gluten Free, Healthy, New Foods and Flavors, Paleo, Product Innovation, Restaurants, Trailer/Street Foods, Trends

If there’s one thing we know Austin does great, it’s food trucks. These portable testaments to culinary dedication span the spectrum of culinary adventurism.

You can find everything from fancy Turkish breakfasts, savory fried bananas, and traditional African cuisine via a local food truck. Honestly, it’s a blessing and a curse. With all this amazing food at your fingertips the budget is always in jeopardy.

For this series we are going to explore some of Austin’s unique food truck options. Our first stop will be Picnik, which, admittedly, is more of a “trailer” than a food truck, but let’s not get hung up on the semantics.

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About Picnik

Picnik focuses on healthful, gluten-free and paleo food options made with only the highest quality ingredients. They set themselves apart from the traditionally decadent food truck scene with a focus on nutrient dense, flavor packed options.

You’ll find no refined sugars or white flour on this menu, but what you will find are unique dishes that will satiate both your stomach and your spirit.

The Food

BUTTER COFFEE

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Butter is back! Sporting a rich aroma with notes of hazelnut, this coffee offers hearty flavor with luxurious mouthfeel. Even with no sugar, the butter coffee hits sweet notes on the palate. The butter and MCT oil offer creamy texture without overwhelming the drinker.

BONE BROTH

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I took the guidance of the barista on this one and ordered the classic beef bone broth with a hit of ginger and spicy pepper. Glad I did. Great flavor, rich notes of marrow, wonderful herbal notes and a kick at the end. In my opinion the ginger came on too strong but overall the broth was executed wonderfully with a beautiful fatless surface.

CHORIZO FRITTATA

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I love eggs. Period. I really wanted to love this frittata. Unfortunately, the heavy cornmeal flavor and aroma snuffed out any taste of chorizo and left it flat. Very dense and a bit under seasoned I’d say the heart is in the right place on this one but it could use a revamp.

BROCCOLI CRUNCH

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I was not expecting to enjoy this dish as much as I did. The broccoli was fresh and bright with great crunch and flavor. I loved the pairing of the creamy avocado oil mayonnaise with sweet currants, salty bacon, and tangy red onions. The only knock on this dish was that the chicken, while flavorful, was overcooked by a good 5 minutes. It was so chewy and fibrous that I pitched it in order to get more of that delicious broccoli.

BLONDIE

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What a winner! Ultra-moist, soft, and bursting with flavor, this gluten-free gem makes you forget flour has purpose. The combination of coconut sugar and almond flour gives off a rich, almost fig-like flavor and texture. Just excellent.

Thoughts

I respect the heck out of Picnik. With an extremely difficult platform they manage to offer good, healthful food choices without skimping on flavor. They’ve got some hurdles to mount but I think they can get there. I would certainly return for a BBB lunch anytime (Bone Broth, Broccoli Crunch, and Blondie).

Where to Picnik

You can visit Picnik online at http://picnikaustin.com/ or at one of their following locations:

1700 S Lamar 400-B
Austin, TX 78704

4801 Burnet Rd.
Austin, TX 78756

 

CHEERS!

August 4th, 2015

Keeping it Fresh: Emerging Restaurants That are Defining the Future of Health Food

Posted in About Allison, Healthy, New Foods and Flavors, Restaurants, Trends

As the general public continues to demand fresh, healthy, and economically feasible food with an environmentally sustainable outlook, investors are looking heavily into new chain concepts that fit the ever evolving needs of the consumer. As a result, there has been an influx of restaurant concepts that are tailored to the growing consumer desire for healthy food. Even at higher price points than typical fast food restaurants, consumers are willing to fork over the extra cash. In fact a full 88% of consumers, when polled, were willing to pay extra for healthier foods, according to a 2015 Nielsen poll.

So, with this in mind, let’s look at a few of the more interesting emerging and growing concepts you need to keep on your radar:

Wayback Burgers: the chain got its start in Newark, DE and from there has spread across the U.S. and Argentina, with now more than 100 locations. From their premium burgers and house made chips to their signature Cricket Shake, the chain is all about fresh cues and innovative menus. In either Oreo Mud Pie or Jerky flavors, the protein rich shakes boast 24 and 20 grams of protein respectively. The shake was actually voted on by consumers to remain on the menu after a very successful LTO offering. This is the first time we see cricket-inspired items on a mainstream menu, so this is an ingredient we need to start considering. While the chain markets itself more as a premium, hand-crafted concept as opposed to a ‘health food’ concept, per se, the addition of the cricket shake is one that is a sign that healthy protein alternatives are gaining acceptance. Not yet mainstream in the U.S., to be sure, but this is a big step in the niche of alternative proteins.

Sus Hi Eatstation: a rather new entry into the fast casual category, Sus Hi features all kinds of sushi, from the traditional Japanese fare to more approachable sushi preparations made with cooked chicken, bacon and other mainstream ingredients. These more mainstream friendly menu items are designed for the entry level sushi eater to ease the transition to raw fish sushi. The founder, Robert Ly, has dubbed himself Grand Master Fun Ly as a way to accent the chain’s focus on fun.

Roti Mediterranean Grill: a Chicago based Mediterranean concept with outposts in New York and Washington, D.C., the Roti Grill offers healthy, filling options for the consumer on the go. You can choose from a wrap, a salad or a rice plate. From there, you pick your protein (these include a salmon and a vegetarian falafel option), vegetables, sauces and sides. They also offer hummus served with house-baked pita.  A simple loyalty program where you snap your receipt for rewards gives incentive to cost-conscious consumers who appreciate coupon-based rewards. Considered one of the healthiest cuisines in the world, it is great to see Mediterranean food enter the spotlight.

Native Foods Café: started in 1994 by a vegan chef, the chain features scratch-made, fresh vegan and vegetarian food. Surprisingly, 85% of visitors fall into the omnivore category, further emphasizing the chain’s widespread appeal. Among the signature items that draw in the omnivores are the Reuben sandwich made with thinly sliced, house made seitan and the meatball sub made with seitan meatballs.

SweetGreen: founded in Washington, D.C., the chain is 31 stores strong and growing. Adhering to a strict set of sustainability practices and offering seasonal menus that rotate based on available produce, the chain has found resonance among the young and upcoming urban professionals in the communities it serves. The current late summer menu includes a watermelon and feta salad and a peach and goat cheese salad among its offerings. Signature dishes available year-round include the kale Caesar and a grain bowl made with quinoa and farro, called the Earth Bowl.

Salata: the Houston based salad concepts features 50 premium toppings as well as 10 house-made dressings, all complemented by your choice of protein. They are now 43 locations strong with projected growth for 10 more openings before the end of 2015. They also feature house made soups and signature teas and lemonades in flavors like plum cinnamon tea, tropical green tea and peach lemonade.

Kosofresh: an emerging chain in New York that features customizable bowls with Korean ingredients, including the highly popular Gochujang, Bulgogi, nori, and Korean radish among the ingredients offered. While they only have 1 location so far, the format and dedication to fresh ingredients with a Chipotle-esque ordering format makes this one concept to watch.

Mendocino Farms: based out of the Los Angeles, CA area, Mendocino Farms is a concept that sources local quality ingredients and combines them into imaginative sandwich combinations. One of the summer sandwiches is the K-Town Bulgogi Ribeye Roll. It features house marinated Bulgogi beef, a spicy Gochujang sauce, a rice vinaigrette slaw and chili aioli, all pressed on a Panini grill. They also feature the V7 (a seven vegetable patty made in house) and cashew feta sandwich called Molly’s Greek Vacation to capture the attention of the vegetarian/vegan demographic.

This list is far from complete, but it clearly illustrates the direction that healthy good-for-you concepts are taking. Be sure to pay extra attention over the coming year as these concepts continue to grow and attract a customer base committed to a healthy lifestyle full of flavor.

February 24th, 2015

The Rise of Savory

Posted in Grocery, Healthy, New Foods and Flavors, Retail, Trends

One of the most interesting recent trends in the food industry is the use of savory ingredients in products that we traditionally consider to be sweet.  The reality is that consumers are craving traditional flavors delivered in new and interesting ways. For foodservice establishments, this new direction could drive business to the portion of the population that prefers savory and salty food items over sweet ones. Here are some trending products to fuel your imagination:

Greek Yogurt

One of the breakout stars of recent years, Greek yogurt now dominates the grocery store shelves. With its healthy reputation and convenience, it is easy to see why it is so popular. So let’s check out a few concepts/products that are capitalizing on this trend:

  1. Blue Hill Farms – specializing in a line of high quality savory yogurts for retail made with 100% grass-fed milk and local produce, with the motto “Know Thy Farmer”, they have managed to carve out a special niche on the grocery store shelves (but don’t expect that to last very long). Flavors include parsnip, carrot, sweet potato, and beet, and are sold at Whole Foods and other select gourmet retailers.
  2. Go Greek Yogurt – featuring Greek yogurt that is actually flown in from Greece, this Los Angeles based yogurt features a variety of savory yogurt toppings that are traditional in Greece, but appear novel to the American consumer. Among the more interesting flavors are the Greek Salad Yogurt (with cucumber, tomato, Kalamata olives, olive oil, oregano, sea salt, and crushed black pepper), Diokles (fresh tomatoes, basil, olive oil, sea salt, crushed black pepper), and the Kosmas (Kalamata olives, basil, olive oil, sea salt, crushed black pepper). All are served with pita for dipping. In addition, their yogurt to-go is packaged in biodegradable clay pot (yes, you heard that right) also sourced from Greece. They state you can throw it in the compost if you like and it will completely breakdown.
  3. Stonyfield – while this product isn’t yogurt technically, it sits on the shelf next to all of the Greek iterations. Made with milk and cheese cultures instead of the traditional yogurt cultures, the product is a completely new product category. Released during Fashion week in 2014 with the hashtag #CheatOnGreek, the flavor is more similar to fromage blanc. It’s less chalky, creamier, and has a mild and fresh flavor, and is attempting to go after yogurt lovers who do not like the chalky taste of Greek yogurt.

Savory Beverages

Another category to get a recent makeover is the beverage category. Consumers are asking for savory and healthy options, and several companies are catering to that demand:

  1. Numi Organics – their line of savory teas includes broccoli-cilantro, carrot-curry, and beet-cabbage. They just released a new line of superfood savory teas containing turmeric as the primary ingredient. Golden tonic features added lemon verbena and dried lime, while Three Roots features added ginger and sweet licorice. Look for more interesting flavors from Numi in the coming year….I am sure they won’t disappoint.
  2. Rus’mmm – this company’s products are based on a secret family recipe. The South Indian beverage features toor dal (yellow pigeon peas), tapioca, coriander, cumin, and turmeric among its ingredients. In original and tomato, it’s an interesting thickened beverage that is sure to satisfy when soup isn’t handy.
  3. Tio – a newcomer to retail the brand focuses on all natural, preservative-free cold gazpachos. Currently in a limited market in Miami, the 3 flavors (Gazpacho Clasico, Gazpacho Verde, and Gazpacho del Sol) are flying off the shelves. The use of HPP technology is used to extend the products shelf life while maintaining the fresh flavor.
  4. Nuwi – the first of its kind quinoa product, Nuwi quinoa drinkable snack features carrot-ginger, split pea, and tomato flavors under its savory umbrella.

Savory Snack Bars

For those consumers looking for convenient fueling options, snack bars are a no-brainer. With the multitude of sweet versions lost to the masses, it was only a matter of time before savory varieties hit the grocery shelves.

  1. Strong and Kind Bars – a recently launched savory line of nutrition bars, and boasting 10g of protein, these bars are a sweet and savory mash-up of flavors. With hickory smoked, honey smoked BBQ, Thai sweet chili, roasted jalapeno, and honey mustard among the offered flavors, there is one for everyone.
  2. Journey Bar – with flavors like coconut curry, sesame ginger, pizza marinara, and rosemary, these bars appear to be taking the global flavor route, all in a vegan-friendly format with 15 grams of whole grains.
  3. Epic – appealing to the paleo diet crowd, these bars made with 100% grass fed buffalo, uncured bacon, and tart cranberries, they contain 11g of protein.
  4. Slow – featuring Moroccan (Pistachio, Currants, Carrots, Ginger), California (Almond, Kale, Pomegranate, Quinoa), Thai (Peanut, Chili, Brown Rice, Bell Pepper), and Indian (Cashew, Cumin, Cauliflower, Coconut) flavors, these bars not only have interesting flavors, but a kale or cauliflower based bar seems intriguing and sure to appeal to the holistic food consumer.
  5. Tanka – featuring prairie raised buffalo, and based on a traditional Lakota Indian recipe for wasna, they are a powerhouse of nutrition, with 14g of protein per 140g bar.

 

Keep a lookout for these and other niche products on the grocery store shelves and let them inspire your culinary development.