April 11th, 2018

Fast Food Quality Is Way Better Than You Think

Posted in Product Innovation, R&D Technology

Recently, a friend of Culinary Culture, Chef Jerome Rejano, was featured in an excellent write up by FoodBeast.com. Read below to learn why the quality of some fast food may be higher than you think it is.

If you would like to see the original article, please click here, and remember to follow our friends at FoodBeast.com for industry news and quality content.

(All content and images hereon courtesy of FoodBeast.com and Constantine Spyrou)

Fast Food Quality Is Way Better Than You Think, This Chef Helps Ensure That

Constantine Spyrou
Feb 20, 2018

What’s your take on fast food quality? Thanks to chefs in the food industry, it may be a lot better than what you think.

fast food quality

Food industry chefs like Jerome Rejano of CTI Foods work to create high-quality foods for the quick service restaurant (QSR) industry. CTI Foods, for example, supplies brands at the national, regional, and local level with soups, sauces, and proteins. These include shredded chicken, taco meat, hamburger patties, steak strips, and chili. “If a fast food restaurant has one of those items, more than likely CTI is manufacturing that,” Rejano, CTI’s director of culinary and innovation, told Foodbeast.

But while most consumers today see fast food as low quality, Rejano and CTI Foods actually work to bring out the best in every single one of their products. Rejano utilizes his fine dining background and food science knowledge to ensure that CTI’s lineup is delicious, safe, and made with quality ingredients.

That job starts with the grades of meat CTI uses for their proteins. When it comes to fast food meats, “there’s always a connotation that it’s dog food, it’s dog meat, it’s what’s gonna go into pet food or canner or something like that,” said Rejano.

However, while each client will allow and disallow specific grades of meat, several specify USDA Select or better. For those unfamiliar with the USDA grading system, Select is the third-highest in terms of quality, behind Choice and Prime. Most of the beef and pork you can find in grocery stores is Select, meaning the meat you buy there is the same CTI uses to make fast food items.

There’s also a lot of quality assurance and food safety procedure that goes into every batch of product sent out to quick-service-restaurants by CTI. Rejano detailed exactly what some of those are:

“Raw material can’t exceed a certain age, if it’s in a package, it can’t exceed X amount of days, and then we have so many days to use it once it’s opened. In manufacturing we have certain temperatures to hit to ensure that everything is fully cooked. And even after things are made, we send them out for microbiological testing to make sure there’s no spoilage, there’s no pathogens in there like E. coli, Salmonella, some of those bugs that you hear about in food. As the manufacturer, we’re really responsible for putting out safe food first, and it’s a benefit on my end if it tastes good.”

Even with all of that testing, chains and clients will still come in for regular audits of CTI’s facilities to ensure everything is up to their specifications. During these visits, Rejano will flex his “culinary muscle” and serve fine dining-type dishes to show that the raw materials CTI works with are of a quality the customer is looking for.

Companies like CTI ensure that what you’re eating at your go-to fast food spots uses the same quality ingredients you can cook with at home. If that’s the case, though, why aren’t these restaurant chains advertising that they’re not selling “dog food” quality product?

A big reason is that if they did, people that saw fast food as higher quality would also see it as more pricey. Many major QSR chains look to capitalize on their value menus to drive traffic. The perception that they had higher-quality meat would harm their “we’re cheap” brand images. The fact that these QSRs are able to marry the two together is a remarkable feat, and something they should get a little more credit for.

Rejano feels that for those skeptical about fast food, they should “give the brand a chance.”

“Depending on what fast food chain you go to, even if you have a restricted diet, or have some likes or dislikes or eat a little bit cleaner, there’s still options out there. These fast food chains are really gearing for a pretty wide net. So if someone’s not a really high fast food user, you still have choices — it’s just a matter of seeking those out. And again, the ingredients are pretty high quality.”

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May 29th, 2017

NRA 2017 – Top Trends

Posted in Consumer Trends, Culinary Conferences, Food Shows, Food Trends, Packaging, Product Innovation

Top Trends in Food from the
2017 NRA Show

Wednesday wrapped up a great week of learning and exploration at the 2017 National Restaurant Association show in Chicago, Il.

There was so much to see, touch, taste, and learn, but I’ll try to pick a few really popular trends to highlight for those of you who couldn’t make it.

Let’s dive in…

#1 – Cold Brew Nitro Coffee

Well if there was one trend that popped up more than any other, it was cold brew nitro coffee. On tap, artisan, slushy, and soft serve varieties available for whatever application you could imagine.

#2 – Go Nuts for Donuts!

Honestly, donuts haven’t really gone anywhere. Everyone loves fried dough. But NRA would show us that donuts, especially exciting, decadent donuts, are thriving. People are loving the idea of customization and seeing donuts in unique places like sandwiches and sundaes.

#3 – Compostables

All image above courtesy of PacknWood. Available at https://www.packnwood.com/home.jhtm.

If you want to take a stake in this millennial market you better be using compostable products. From plates, cups, straws, wrapper, utensils, to-go boxes, and even chopsticks, compostable products have become a must for any operation that wants to be a serious competitor.

Others

Other noteworthy trends included sparkling beverages, including coffee and kombucha, guacamole variations, atomization in the food process, and a continuing array of vegetarian and vegan food products.

If you’ve noticed any cool trends or were at the NRA 2017 show and saw something I missed, let me know! We’d love to hear from you.

Cheers!

 

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November 14th, 2016

Food Trends Series: Ancient Grains

Posted in Food Trends, Gluten Free, Grains, Healthy, Trends
Food Trends Research Chef
Picture courtesy of Restaurant Girl

Food Trends – Ancient Grains

With the increased public interest in food trends such as farm to table and eco-friendly food service, it should come as no surprise that ancient grains are breaking into the spotlight.

While all grains are, technically, ancient, this term refers to those oldest varieties that haven’t been transformed by humans over the thousands of years we’ve been growing them. Examples include:

While not an exhaustive list, this does illustrate the diversity of ancient grains. Each of these provides different flavors, textures, and dense nutritional profiles to assist in the maintenance of a healthful diet.

Food Trends Recipe development
Picture courtesy of NY Times Cooking

Ancient grains also gain attention for their hypoallergenic nature. Most are inherently gluten-free and when used in place of standard wheat flours, remove one of the top allergens from a recipe.

Diners love the authenticity and excitement that the use of ancient grains provides and chefs love the versatility of using them. From components in simple sides or salads, coatings for other foods either whole or in the form of flours, or as a reliable main dish, ancient grains are becoming staples of the professional chef and home cook’s kitchen.

Research on Food Trends
Savory Oatmeal Picture courtesy of Daily Burn

For more great information about ancient grains read the June edition of the Culinology Magazine provided by our friends at the Research Chefs Association.

Also, check out these unique recipes using ancient grains:

Thanks for reading along! If you’ve seen any awesome or unique uses of ancient grains, or want to talk food trends, leave a comment below. We’d love to hear from you.

 

Cheers!

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