July 10th, 2017

Holy Hot Sauce!

Posted in Food Trends, Trends

Hot Sauce from the Subiaco Monks

A couple weeks ago we posted a Hot Sauce 101 blog discussing how hot sauces are produced and their cultural popularity. While doing on some online reading this week, I came across an article about the Subiaco Abbey Monks of Arkansas who make their own Habanero pepper sauce, which tied right into the Hot Sauce 101 discussion.

Monk Sauce

Hot sauce

Img. courtesy of www.countrymonks.biz

Aptly named “Monk Sauce,” this bright pepper sauce sold in varieties of red and green and is distributed via an online store both nationally and internationally. The product of Fr. Richard Walz, Monk Sauce comes from a recipe he developed while serving in Belize. Beginning in the winter months, Fr. Walz’s habanero peppers are grown from starter plants held over from the previous season. Meticulously watched over until they are ready for use, the peppers are harvested either green (peak growth), or red (full ripeness), to achieve a variation in sauce flavor and intensity.

The sauce is flavored with onions, garlic, and vinegar, balancing some of the blistering heat from the habaneros. Fr. Walz claims the Monk Sauce clocks in at 250,000 Scoville units, or about 100x hotter than the average jalapeno. I’m not one to argue with a Monk, so I’m taking his word for it, at least until my order arrives…

Check out the Subiaco Monks online store for Monk Sauces and Abbey Brittle.

 

Cheers!

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June 12th, 2017

Hot Sauce 101

Posted in Trends

Hot Sauce

Let’s face it, we love hot sauce. Whether you’re a Sriracha-holic, Gochujang trend-setter, or Tabasco purist, (for me it’s Yellow Bird) it’s more than likely you’re hitting your pizza with some hot sauce pizzazz. At least we can all agree Buffalo sauce is great.

Since, as a planet, we consume so much hot sauce, I think we should have a better understanding of how it’s made. Therefore, I give you Hot Sauce 101:

Pepper Power

Pepper Sauce

When it comes to hot sauces, it all starts with the pepper. Sure, it seems obvious, but the flavor of the sauce is dictated by the type, quality, and ripeness of the pepper you use.

Once the pepper has been picked (presumably by someone named Peter)the stems are removed and the pepper is washed thoroughly.

The peppers are then mashed, chopped, or ground in preparation for the next step.

Of All the Flavors, You Chose Salty

Hot sauce 101

Now that we have clean pepper mash, it’s time to bring out depth of flavor. This is accomplished by adding salt in a concentration of 15-20% (or higher in some cases), thus beginning the fermentation stage. Remember two things, a higher salt concentration means a longer fermentation and a cleaner flavor, but a salt concentration under 9% allows for malolactic fermentation (like in wine), which creates an unpleasant flavor in pepper-based sauces.

The salted mash is placed in a breathable covered container and agitated periodically. Fermentation times vary by sauce type and batch size anywhere from 15 days to 6 months.

Once desired fermentation is achieved, peppers may be further processed and strained to remove seeds and fibers, leaving only a soft, fermented pulp.

Acid Trip

How to make hot sauce

Now it’s time to bring out the acid. Most hot sauces use vinegar in this step. Not only does the vinegar add to the flavor, it also helps protect the sauce from spoilage. The high salt and acid ratios mean many hot sauces are entirely shelf-stable.

Welcome to Flavor Town

Culinary Consultants

At this point, the sauce is ready to be customized for flavor. Onions, garlic, bean curd, spices and various other ingredients are added to the sauce to individualize the flavor.

It’s important to note, the addition of these ingredients increase the water activity in the sauce. It can very easily go from shelf-stable to refrigeration required with only a small amount of water. This water can come from garlic bulbs, berries, or other flavoring agents.

Keep it Safe

Even if you’re just making a sauce to enjoy at home it never hurts to play it safe. Place your sauce in sanitized jars with tightly closing lids that can be submerged in boiling water until the internal temperature reaches 185 degrees Fahrenheit. Cool the jar and store appropriately. In commercial applications, this step is accomplished in large batches in either pouches or bottles.

hot sauce

Unfortunately, more delicate flavors, like cilantro, can be degraded in a heating step. But for most sauces that rely on pepper mash and dried herbs for the flavor profile, this won’t negatively affect the flavor.

Hope you learned something! We love hot sauces over here so please drop a comment and let us know some of the great flavors or methods for production you’ve tried.

Cheers!

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